Gorge Greenery Reviews: Pineapple Diem from EVOLVD

It’s no secret: We’re big fans of the high-quality extract produced by EVOLVD Organics. EVOLVD’s cartridges are the best you can find in the Northwest, and we support this kind of quality in this industry.

It is quite commonplace in the cannabis industry to see innovation. This can be innovation in how you grow the plant. It can be innovation in how you cook or craft an edible. In EVOLVD’s case, there is innovation in how you vape.

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At the Greenery, we just got in the new line of EVOLVD Capsl500 cartridges. Each cartridge contains a half gram of EVOLVD’s renowned and award winning extract. Their extraction methods are utterly unmatched. No other cartridge has such a diverse profile of cannabinoids and terpenes that are found in the end product. For our review, we decided to take the Pineapple Diem out for a spin.

Pineapple Diem is a cross of Golden Pineapple and Mystery Haze, both strains grown by the revered cultivator Green Bodhi. If you remember Green Bodhi’s Golden Pineapple, that should be enough incentive for you to stop reading this review and go grab this cartridge right away. One of the most memorable traits of Green Bodhi’s flower is just how impressive it’s flavor and effect is, both of which are very apparent in Pineapple Diem.

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This is where the Capsl500 variable airflow mechanism shines. The cap on the cartridge can be rotated. Rotating the cartridge opens up a small port on the top of the mouthpiece. Think of it as a carb for your vape pen. Opening the port allows more airflow for a smoother draw, diffusing much of the vaporized extract. Closing the port, makes for thicker, cloudier vapes, often accompanied by an immediate and strong effect. Be responsible, friends. A little bit goes a long way.

There is a truly organic and fresh taste to Pineapple Diem. After just one draw, we’re delightfully overwhelmed with is floral yet fruity taste. The effect is almost immediate. This is quite an upbeat strain! After enjoying a reasonable amount of the cartridge, which for some people is just one draw, we took a sunset stroll down to the Hood River sandbar. The Diem was definitely conducive to enjoying our walk. The colors of the sunset were inviting, the sand was soft, and the air was crisp with the cool fall air.  The evening, paired with Pineapple Diem, brought out the joys of all our days spent on the sandbar this summers past. However, we’re glad to feel the fall air as we watched the sun set on turning leaves. You could see them all the way down The Gorge.

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Grower Highlight: Trailhead Farms

Gorge Greenery now stocks flower from the local, small-batch farm Trailhead Farms. Located just on the edge of Hood River city limits, the Greenery was given a tour of Trailhead Farms. We got the inside look on how this Clean Green Certified farm is operated.

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Dave, one of the founders of Trailhead, checks us in at the farm and gives us a lay of the land. Trailhead Farms has three greenhouses, with room to build one more for next season’s grow. "We're an organic grow." Dave says, as he points out that Trailhead is neighbors with other farmers. Their neighbors are multi-generational fruit farmers sticking to organic growing practices that resist spraying pesticides and fertilizers. They care about their crop, and so does Trailhead Farms.

Trailhead Farms is a Clean Green Certified grower, meaning that they have either met or exceeded a multitude of guidelines that ensures that the farm has a low impact on the environment. Now more than ever, we need more farms to adopt sustainable growing practices. Trailhead has solar panels mounted on their south-facing roofs with plans to install more. Their greenhouses act as water collectors. Any rainfall on the greenhouses drains into gutters and is saved in storage tanks onsite to be used for watering later. Simple solutions like these make a big difference in maintaining a sustainable grow.

Most of Trailhead's grow for the summer season has already been harvested, so the greenhouses sit nearly empty. That, however, doesn’t mean that their work is over.

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"The soil is alive,” Dave says, "And we work hard to take care of it. It's what keeps the plant happy and healthy." Dave scoops up a handful of soil to show us, and it immediately becomes clear that “Alive” is the right word of choice. The dirt is soft, dark, and even has some worms here and there. It’s filled with plant and animal life, and that’s a good thing. Dave describes the cycles of nutrients that the farm will use to help nourish the soil and, in turn, the plant. Whole malted barley, kelp, and fish bone meal are just a few of the all-natural ingredients Trailhead utilizes to nourish the soil.

One thing that was clear to us on our tour of Trailhead Farms was their attention to detail. When you run a smaller operation, you spend more time focusing on every aspect of what it takes to grow quality, clean cannabis. Their hard work has paid off.

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Electric Lemon, Kimbo Kush X Cookies and Cream, Double Tangie Banana, and Tiger Beat names only just a few of their strains grown this season. When you run a small grow operation, the quality of the flowers you grow is very noticeable. The flavors are more rich and diverse, the high is cleaner and more enjoyable, and the plant has a higher variety of cannabinoids.

Kimbo Kush X Cookies & Cream

Kimbo Kush X Cookies & Cream

Choosing your cannabis isn't just about how high the THC percentage is. It’s about how the plant is grown. We are proud to carry Trailhead Farms cannabis. They are a sustainable Hood River farm. They produce a quality crop that was grown with passion and care. We are huge fans of what they do. Locally grown with care, Trailhead Farms embodies what craft cannabis cultivation is all about.

Why Gorge Greenery? We're not your average dispensary

In November of 2014, Oregon voters approved of Measure 91, allowing recreational sales of marijuana. Ever since that date, the Green Rush came to Oregon. It brings with it a swath of new and bustling industry where there was only black market and shady dealings before. Now, in 2017, cannabis dispensaries can be found in almost every corner of the state. There are 167 dispensaries in the city of Portland alone. This now begs the question: what's the difference between these shops anyway? What sets one cannabis dispensary apart from the other? How important is it that I choose the right shop?

When consuming cannabis, it's important to know where the product came from, more so if its the right choice of strain or edible for you. Many dispensaries out there pay this important detail no mind, and simply want to sell you marijuana. It's a brave new world out there, and we here at Gorge Greenery™ make customer service our mission, as well as being a standout, high-quality dispensary. Here's what sets us apart from the rest.

Budtender Knowledge

Our budtenders have years of knowledge when it comes to all things cannabis. Its important to choose a knowledgeable budtender when choosing the cannabis product that is right for you. Top Gorge Greenery™ budtenders have received level 2 certification from the Trichrome Institute in Colorado. The Trichrome Institute educates with a scientific approach and coaches our staff to identify strains of cannabis by look and smell alone. The Trichrome Institute also educates attendees on how to identify inconsistences and deficiencies in cannabis. By taking this course, our staff can guarantee only top quality and organic products are on our shelves.

Sourcing Products

At Gorge Greenery, we stand behind our products. We take the time to learn more about the Oregon growers and producers with the intention of selling flower, concentrates, edibles and other cannabis derived products. We only accept the highest quality products.  To achieve this, we strictly adhere to the following:

  • We ensure all flower is grown without use of pesticides, herbicides or fungicides and cultivated using natural and organic practices. We tour every farm that is featured on our menu.
  • Our concentrates and vaporizer cartridges are pure. No glycol, no butane, no additives, no artificial flavors.
  • Quality edibles from talented bakers, confectionists, and chocolatiers.
  • Effective and relieving topicals from skilled processors.

Sourcing our products is extremely important. The Cannabis industry is a bustling and growing industry.  By taking the initiative to visit each and every farm and producer that we carry, we are preventing low-quality or unsound products from reaching the shelves. This extra step is a part of our promise to protect the consumer and provide the highest quality products.

Sustainability

We strive to achieve sustainable practices at the Greenery. We package all flower in-house using glass jars, which can be returned using a sustainable, eco-friendly reward program. We are strong advocates for reducing plastic waste and more sustainable practices industry wide. We are the only certified dispensary that is licensed to handle organic products in the Columbia Gorge. Our staff and dispensary is certified by Clean Green and Certified Kind foundations whom are working towards recognizing and promoting clean, organic cannabis.

Locally Owned and Operated

We are as local as it gets here in The Gorge! All of our staff has been drawn to the Columbia River Gorge with the passion for adventure and cannabis. We love the lives we live in this beautiful area. We are proud to be a locally owned business that promotes exploration and enjoyment of the Columbia River Gorge to locals and tourists alike

Terpenes of Cannabis: Pinene and Humulene

Everybody who’s tried marijuana is familiar with the fact that it is one of the more pungent plants out there. So what causes this? Why does cannabis smell the way it does and why is there such a variety to these smells? The answer: Terpenes.

Terpenes are essential oils, found throughout nature in just about everything worth a smell. From sage and lavender to oranges, mangos, and hops, terpenes are found in just about everything with odor, including Cannabis.

Terpenes are more than just smell, however. Independent studies have revealed that there may be some therapeutic value to the molecules when either ingested or inhaled. Think about this: how do you feel when you take a smell of fresh lavender? Generally, the pleasant smell leaves you feeling very relaxed, an excellent de-stressor. Another example: What happens when you bite into a lemon? Odds are the sour taste and smell will leave you awakened and invigorated. Well, there are terpenes associated with these feelings: Linalool in Lavender and Limonene in Lemons. And both of these terpenes, along with many others, are found in cannabis.

This week we explore two unique terpenes: Pinene and Humulene.

Pinene

Pinene, like its terpene cousins myrcene and limonene, is found in many non-cannabis plants. In fact, it is the most common terpene found in the plant world. Like the name suggests, Pinene carries the scent of pine needles.

Pinene’s potential medical benefits include increased mental focus and energy. It also carries the potential to act as a bronchodilator, making it helpful for people with asthma and other respiratory ailments. Some studies have even cited its power to help reduce the size of cancerous tumors.

These traits are derived from its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Once in the brain, it could affect existing neurotransmitters in such a manner that it results in better memory. Pinene has also shown to inhibit the influence of THC.

The power of pinene is nothing new. For thousands of years many cultures around the world have used plants containing large quantities of pinene, like rosemary and sage, for the preservation and enhancement of memory. It’s only today that researchers have a minor understanding of how pinene accomplishes this in the brain.

Humulene

Humulene, found in clove, basil, hops, and cannabis sativa, bares an earthy and woody aroma with spicy herbal notes. Humulene is one of the components of the essential oil from the flowering cone of the hops plant and gives the common beer its hoppy taste. Did you ever think your beer and cannabis would have some of the same molecular components?

As for potential medical benefits, Humulene was observed to have potentially powerful analgesic, anti-bacterial and anti-tumor properties. These traits themselves could be accredited to the entourage effect of cannabis, as these properties are found in many other different terpenes, anti-inflammatory and pain relief traits in particular. However, the standout trait of Humulene is its potential as a natural appetite suppressant. This can be an ideal trait in cannabis for users who do not want to be subjected to a munchie attack, a common side effect of cannabis use.

The aroma of a certain strain of cannabis can be very telling, and learning the traits of terpenes can help you make decisions on what strain you take home with you. Remember, higher-quality, responsibly and organically grown marijuana will have the highest yield on terpenes and cannabinoids, so keep this in mind next time you look for a natural remedy to whatever it is that ails you.

 

Sources:

https://www.massroots.com/learn/pinene-cannabis

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0014299907005419

http://theleafonline.com/c/science/2014/11/terpene-profile-humulene/

4/20 at Gorge Greenery

It's the day of the year we've all been waiting for. April 20th (4/20), the official marijuana holiday, is nearly upon us!

The counter-culture holiday takes its roots from the "official" time of the day cannabis lovers gather and smoke with one another: 4:20 pm. Many different urban legends tell us origin stories of why this time in particular was chosen; some say it was the police code number for marijuana use, though the most accepted story of origin refers to a group of friends, the "Waldos", who had a set meeting time of 4:20 pm to gather together and search for a hidden marijuana crop. 4:20 pm has since become the de-facto marijuana smoking time for cannabis lovers across the world.

It was only a matter of time before April 20th became a holiday in and of itself. When the calendar strikes 4/20, marijuana enthusiasts rejoice and dedicate the entire day to the plant they know and love.

Gorge Greenery™ will be doing the same. On Thursday, April 20th, the Greenery will have sales all day long. Here are just some of the specials we will be offering:

  • Clean Green Certified grams starting at $5
  • $4 Pre-rolls from Otis Gardens and sofresh farms (Clean Green Certified Grower)
  • $20 dab specials from Dab Society
  • Edible specials from Peak Extracts
  • Giveaways and GG swag all day

Come and join us for our favorite day of the year. And remember: always pass it to the left.

Life with plastics, and how to move away from it

Plastics have transformed our world. They revolutionized manufacturing. They triggered an explosion of economic development. Plastics helped with the advancements in technology and medicine that reached every corner of the globe. Plastics helped make the world what it is today. Without them, modern life would not be the same.

But at what cost?

We have a plastic use for just about everything. It’s used to preserve our fruits and vegetables, it makes for convenient and disposable carry-out bags, and even the keys on this keyboard are made of plastic. Hospitals were modernized with plastics, creating cheaper medical necessities such as syringes and sterile bandages. Many modern automobiles have plastic chassis. There is no doubt that plastics have provided countless uses and advantages to living comfortably in this world, but at what point does it become wasteful and harmful?

Plastic’s positive trait is also its negative: it lasts virtually forever. Plastic products can take, on average, 450-1000 years to biodegrade, and this leads to a buildup. The more plastic you make and use, the more of it, inevitably, ends up in the environment, and that’s where the most damage is truly done. “Single use” plastic products have the most lasting and damaging effect on the environment. Things such as plastic bags, plastic utensils and cups, plastic and Styrofoam takeaway containers, and plastic bottles serve only as a single use item before they are disposed of. This results in a high amount of waste generation, and is often completely unnecessary.

Take a look at this article out of the South China Morning Post. Hong Kong locals are lamenting over the excessive amount of trash that is washing up on their beaches. A local videographer points out that much of this waste comes from excessive packaging.

Do you see any similar patterns in our grocery store with the repacking of bulk fruits and vegetables?

Single use plastic cling wrap. Single use styrofoam trays. Why not chop your veggies at home?

Single use plastic cling wrap. Single use styrofoam trays. Why not chop your veggies at home?

This is an unnecessary and wasteful amount of plastic packaging. And while packaging products for transport and a prolonged shelf life does make sense in terms of preserving the product, there is such a thing as too much packaging. Chopping up vegetables and sticking them in yet another plastic package as a means of selling a product is an unnecessary waste. Why are we repackaging bulk fruits and veggies to entice the consumer to purchase? At what point do we stop putting profits ahead of generating avoidable waste? Do we have to sacrifice profits to prevent generating new waste?

The art of reusing and repurposing plastics is a growing trend. Again, the buildup of plastics continues and landfills are reaching capacity with plastics. They inevitably spill over into our environment, thus polluting it. Marine life is often poisoned, stunted or killed by plastic products. Public lands grow more polluted with plastics every day. All of this pollution creates incentive to curb it and roll it back, and when large organizations get behind this movement, much can be achieved. Take Ikea, for example.

Ikea is pioneering a new movement of recycling plastics and completely repurposing them, in this case for furniture, cupboards and countertops. If there is an abundance of a resource that isn’t going anywhere for a millennium, why not use it? This sort of environmentally friendly business practice makes a measurable difference in the world. Ikea also announced that it sent zero waste to landfill across all of its UK and Ireland facilities in 2016, achieving a 90% recycling rate in the process.

Ultimately, the best way to reduce plastic trash in the short term is ending the use of unsustainable single-use plastics entirely. One of the most harmful and common forms of plastic waste are plastic bags that you find at large retail outlets or grocers, and people are pushing for a complete plastic bag ban. The state of California voted to approve Proposition 67, enforcing a statewide ban on carry-out plastic bags. There is a similar sentiment in our own town of Hood River. On March 1st, all retailers with more than 50 employees (Walmart, Safeway, Roseauers) are now prohibited from using plastic bags, and retailers with less than 50 employees have until July 1st to comply with the new city ordinance. Here at Gorge Greenery, we package all of our cannabis in reusable glass jars and use reusable fabric exit bags.

Plastics aren’t going anywhere anytime soon. However, we can curb some of the adverse impacts, and even reduce the negative impact it has on our environment. All it takes is a little effort in reducing personal use, and some creative thinking to repurpose waste that is already here to stay. It can be done, we just have to change a few comfortable habits!

Terpenes of Cannabis: Linalool and Beta-Caryophyllene

Everybody who’s tried marijuana before is familiar with the fact that it is one of the more pungent plants out there. So what causes this anyway? Why does cannabis smell the way it does, and why is there such a variety to these smells? The answer: Terpenes.

Terpenes are essential oils, found throughout nature in just about everything worth a smell. From sage and lavender to oranges, mangos, and hops, terpenes are found in just about everything with odor, including Cannabis.

Terpenes are more than just smell, however. Independent studies have revealed that there may be some therapeutic value to the molecules when either ingested or inhaled. Think about this: how do you feel when you take a smell of fresh lavender? Generally, the pleasant smell leaves you feeling very relaxed, an excellent de-stressor. Another example: What happens when you bite into a lemon? Odds are the sour taste and smell will leave you awakened and invigorated. Well, there are terpenes associated with these feelings: Linalool in Lavender and Limonene in Lemons. And both of these terpenes, along with many others, are found in cannabis.

 This week we are going to dive in to two lesser known yet ever-present terpenes: Linalool and Beta-Caryophyllene.

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Linalool

One of the minor terpenes found in cannabis, Linalool conveys a soothing floral aroma, similar to that of Lavender. In fact, Linalool is found in lavender, along with more than 200 species of plants, including a variety of mints and herbs, such as the Indian Bay Leaf and Basil.

And while this terpene may not be as dominant as others, like Myrcene and Limonene, this doesn’t negate the medicinal properties associated with it. Linalool has a number of therapeutic traits.

It has natural analgesic properties, which can be helpful for such conditions as multiple sclerosis, dystonia, arthritis, post-operative pain and chronic pain. Linalool is also known to have Anti-Consultant properties, which can be very desirable for those who suffer from epilepsy, nerve damage, or another convulsing condition.

Linalool can also be an effective sleep aid. The terpene possesses natural sedative qualities, so those looking for a good night’s sleep may wish to find a strain of cannabis that has higher levels of Linalool. Remember to follow your nose! Smelling multiple strains of cannabis is key to detecting a strain that may aid in your sleep.

Beta-Caryophyllene

Chances are, you’ve already been exposed to large amounts of Beta-Caryophyllene in your lifetime without even realizing it. Beta-Caryophyllene, or BCP, is found in many spices, such as oregano, cloves, hops, rosemary, and common household black pepper.

One trait that sets BCP apart from other terpenes is how it reacts with your body’s endocannabinoid system. BCP is often categorized as a cannabinoid because of how it binds to CB2 cannabinoid receptors, which causes no alteration in perception or motor skills. The body’s CB2 receptors control immune-regulatory proteins that are linked to inflammation and immune function throughout the body, giving BCP anti-inflammatory properties.

Like many of the other terpenes, such as Limonene and Pinene, BCP has been known to reduce anxiety and fight depression. This may yet be another feature of what is known as the “entourage effect”. One of the troubles with isolating the medicinal properties of cannabis is that there are so many medicinal traits associated with several different parts of the plant on several different levels of the plants biology. The prevailing theory is that all of the properties work best when taken together at once, rather than isolating a certain terpene or cannabinoid, since each terpene has their own special molecular trait that sets them apart from the rest. When working together, the medicinal value only increases, and Beta-Caryophyllene is very much a part of this entourage.

There it is! Knowledge of two more terpenes for you to keep under your cap next time you go cannabis shopping. Remember, higher-quality, responsibly and organically grown marijuana will have the highest yield on terpenes and cannabinoids, so keep this in mind next time you look for a natural remedy to whatever it is that ails you.

Next edition of Terpenes of Cannabis we dive into two very unique terpenes: Pinene and Humulene.

Sources:

https://www.whaxy.com/learn/linalool-cannabis-terpene?utm_source=mantis&utm_medium=recommend&utm_campaign=mantis&muuid=2cce4636XXX0b9cXXX45beXXX9e4fXXXa70bbfafc9c1

https://www.whaxy.com/learn/beta-caryophyllene?utm_source=mantis&utm_medium=recommend&utm_campaign=mantis&muuid=2cce4636XXX0b9cXXX45beXXX9e4fXXXa70bbfafc9c1

We're always open! -- New Year, New Rules for Oregon Cannabis

With the coming of the new year we are seeing new regulations in the ever evolving Cannabis industry. Let's talk through some of the new changes, and what that means for medical marijuana patients and recreational shoppers.

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First off, we're still open!

In order to stay a recreational dispensary, marijuana businesses must be licensed with the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC). The OLCC is the main governing body for all businesses associated with the recreational cannabis world, whereas the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) handles all medical marijuana dispensaries. All growers, processors and dispensaries in Oregon started on the OHA license, but in order to serve the public recreationally, they had to switch to the OLCC license. The deadline to make this switch was January 1st, 2017, so if you haven't made the switch before then, you can no longer sell marijuana recreationally. Gorge Greenery made the switch to the OLCC license back in October, so our doors are open.

Furthermore, during this years election, Hood River residents voted to approve a 3% tax increase on recreational marijuana, bringing the current rate to 20%. This 3%, however, goes directly towards the city of Hood River and is not a part of the 17% that is paid to the Oregon government as a whole. To give some insight here: Washington's cannabis tax sits at 37%, and Colorado's is around 30%, depending on what part of the state you live in. Oregon currently has the lowest marijuana tax in the country.

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New rules and limits for Medical Marijuana Patients

With all the rapid changes with recreational cannabis, where does this leave the medical marijuana patient? Members of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP) have been feeling understandably frustrated as more and more growers, processors, and dispensaries switch to the recreational marketplace. Fortunately, there are still provisions set in place to accommodate OMMP patients that the Greenery is able to offer.

Oregon Medical Marijuana Patients:

  • Are exempt from the 20% cannabis tax.
  • Can purchase up to 24 ounces of dried usable cannabis. (Recreational users are limited to one ounce.)
  • Can purchase edibles with a THC content higher than 50mg.
The Grön dark chocolate bites are 75mg THC each. Available to medical patients only.

The Grön dark chocolate bites are 75mg THC each. Available to medical patients only.

The world of legalized marijuana is an exciting yet tumultuous place. We are all venturing into uncharted territory, and keeping up to date on all the new rules and regulations can be a difficult and confusing process. That said, we here at Gorge Greenery make it our mission to stay as up to date on all the latest news and current events as possible, so if you ever have any questions or concerns, don't hesitate to ask. We'll be here.

Have a question? Email us here at info@gorgegreenery.com

Message us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GorgeGreeneryHoodRiver/

 

OLCC Recreational Marijuana Homepage: http://www.oregon.gov/olcc/marijuana/Pages/default.aspx

Images provided by pixabay.com

Terpenes of Cannabis: Myrcene and Limonene

Everybody who’s tried marijuana before is familiar with the fact that it is one of the more pungent plants out there. So what causes this anyway? Why does cannabis smell the way it does, and why is there such a variety to these smells? The answer: Terpenes.

Terpenes are essential oils, found throughout nature in just about everything worth a smell. From sage and lavender to oranges, mangos, and hops, terpenes are found in just about everything worth smelling. And the same goes for cannabis.

Terpenes are more than just smell, however. Independent studies have revealed that there may be some therapeutic value to the molecules when either ingested or inhaled. Think about this: how do you feel when you take a smell of fresh lavender? Generally, the pleasant smell leaves you feeling very relaxed, an excellent de-stressor. Another example: What happens when you bite into a lemon? Odds are the sour taste and smell will leave you awakened and invigorated. Well, there are terpenes associated with these feelings: Linalool in Lavender and Limonene in Lemons. And both of these terpenes, along with many others, are found in cannabis, providing similar effects. This week we are going to dive in to two of the most common terpenes found in cannabis: Myrcene and Limonene.

 

MYRCENE

Myrcene is one of the most common terpenes found in cannabis, with an odor described as musky, earthy, and herbal – similar to cloves. Myrcene can be found in a wide variety of plants, such as bay leaves, eucalyptus, wild thyme, and lemon grass. It’s no surprise that myrcene is found in hops as well, as hops and cannabis are cousins, both members of the family Cannabaceae.

But what exactly does myrcene do? This molecule has been known to possess many therapeutic qualities, which is especially pertinent to cannabis users seeking to find a strain that will best fit their desired outcome. Myrcene is best known as a “couch-lock” terpene, meaning that it’s properties are generally very sedative in nature. Users of a strain high in Myrcene can expect muscle relaxation, diminished inflammation, and a general feeling of sedation and comfort. Many Indica strains have higher concentrations of Myrcene, which explains their relaxing effects.

 Myrcene is also known to lower the resistance across the blood-to-brain barrier, allowing a quicker uptake of THC. This means that strains higher in Myrcene will have a faster acting psychoactive effect in comparison to other strains with limited Myrcene content. Fun fact: some say that eating a mango (very high in Myrcene) 45 minutes prior to consuming cannabis will dramatically increase the effects of whatever strain of marijuana you may be smoking.

So, in summation, when you smell a strain of cannabis that bears a hoppy smell or reminds you of fresh mangos, be ready for a feeling of total relaxation and sedation, and make sure your couch is ready for an extended lockout.

 

 

LIMONENE

Another active and common terpene found in cannabis is Limonene. Limonene smells of citrus, juniper, rosemary, or peppermint. Lemons and other citrus fruits contain high levels of limonene, which explains where the name is derived. If you smell a strain of marijuana that reminds you of fresh cut lemons, this should come as no surprise since both plants possess the exact same molecules.

So, what can this terpene do for us? Limonene is a known mood elevator, proven to be very beneficial to those suffering from depression. Therefore, strains high in Limonene promote a general uplift in mood and attitude, so if this is the effect you are going for, follow your nose to strains that bear that easily recognizable citrus smell. Think mom’s fresh squeezed lemonade next time you go about smelling strains. This is likely to lead you to sativa strains which are often associated with an uplifting and energizing effect.

Limonene has also been known to possess excellent medicinal qualities as well, bearing natural anti-fungal properties as well as an aid to acid reflux. This terpene also has anti-anxiety properties, which could be very beneficial to those prone to anxiety and paranoia yet seek the potential medical benefits of marijuana. Helpful tip: always have a glass of water with lemon nearby next time you try cannabis. This is an excellent use of Limonene that helps deter the potential side effects of anxiety and paranoia that is often associated with use of marijuana.

 

There we have it! These are only a few of the effects associated with Limonene and Myrcene. Who knows what we will discover as more studies of terpenes and their role on cannabis are revealed over time. Until then, just remember to follow your nose! Next time we dive in to more terpenes: Linalool and Caryophyllene.

 

Sources:

https://www.whaxy.com/learn/myrcene-cannabis?utm_source=mantis&utm_medium=recommend&utm_campaign=mantis&muuid=2cce4636XXX0b9cXXX45beXXX9e4fXXXa70bbfafc9c1

https://www.medicaljane.com/category/cannabis-classroom/terpenes/#terpenes-in-cannabis

http://theleafonline.com/c/science/2014/09/terpene-profile-myrcene/

https://www.whaxy.com/learn/what-is-limonen

Organic Marijuana: Fiction vs. Fact

Alright team, it's time to talk about Organic Marijuana. In the age where people are particularly concerned about the quality of what they eat or drink, it's no coincidence that the same concern applies to the quality of cannabis they smoke or ingest.

The term “organic” isn’t thrown around lightly. Food and beverage manufacturers go through arduous procedures and regulations when it comes to producing a product that can be deemed organic. An organic orange is by and far different from a normally produced orange. Now this isn’t to say that a non-organic orange is “unsafe”, but the quality of the product is noticeably different. Think of it this way; a Chevy Impala and a Ferrari 458 Italia are both cars that will get you from point A to point B, however there will be a difference in what you experience during that drive.

 

                       I’ll take the red one…

So it's no wonder that the same level of concern over quality applies to the booming marijuana industry in Oregon. As recreational use rises, so has the demand for high quality or “organic” marijuana. Dispensaries all over Oregon have begun to offer “organic” marijuana, and much to the users’ delight. High quality cannabis usually results in a high quality experience.

That said, “Organic” marijuana is not actually a thing. At all. It’s not real.

Now that’s not to say that high quality cannabis isn’t out there; quite the opposite. The Clean Green Certification and Certified Kind program is a new means of ensuring quality cultivation practices from growers, ensuring a high quality product for the consumers to enjoy. Their basis of testing for high quality cultivation is nearly identical to the practices of the USDA: Soil quality, pesticide use, environmental impact, etc. Plus, most smaller farming operations take care to produce a crop that they are proud of, something that they would enjoy consuming themselves.

No there is a different reason why “Organic” marijuana is not a thing. In order for a product to receive the Organic label, it must first go through a series of tests and certifications through the USDA. In short, to receive the Organic label, the producer must ensure that the product is:

  • Produced without excluded methods, (e.g., genetic engineering, ionizing radiation, or sewage sludge).

  • Produced using allowed substances. (No synthetic soils, no harmful pesticides, etc.)

  • Overseen by a USDA National Organic Program-authorized certifying agent, following all USDA organic regulations.

So why can’t these regulatory practices apply to marijuana? The USDA is prohibited from working with cannabis.

The USDA is a federal agency that oversees all organic labeling requirements, setting the standard across the US for producing Organic products. Now, being a federal agency, do you think the USDA is in a position to apply the same Organic labeling practices to marijuana? No way. The federal government still classifies marijuana as a schedule 1 narcotic, and as long as cannabis stays on as schedule 1, we will never see “Organic pot”.

So what does this mean for the consumer who seeks out only high quality cannabis. What about the driver who wants the Ferrari 458 and the 458 alone? This is where the Clean Green Certification and the Certified Kind program comes in. Independent from federal and state governments, these organizations provide the standardization and regulation processes similar to the USDA’s Organic labeling in order to ensure a high quality marijuana product produced under sustainable and “clean” practices. These programs check for:

  • Use of organic cultivation methods

  • Prevention of soil erosion and nutrient runoff

  • Water conservation methods from a legal water source

  • Carbon Footprint Reduction (CFR) program

  • Fair trade/fair working conditions

  • Legal compliance/non-black market

Each of these programs go above and beyond what the USDA requires for the organic label, and provide both standardization to the quality of cannabis products as well accountability to the grower. So those looking for “Organic” pot should seek out Clean Green Certified and Certified Kind strains and dispensaries (like Gorge Greenery!)

Recreational and Medical users alike need to be vigilant when they purchase their marijuana. Oregon is home to 400+ legal marijuana dispensaries, but any dispensary that claims they sell “Organic” marijuana should be given a second thought. This isn’t to say that their quality of cannabis is sub-par (quite the opposite; it’s probably pretty darn good if they call it “Organic”), but to call the product “Organic” is false advertising. The USDA will never put the true Organic label on cannabis, not until major change at the federal level is achieved. So when you’re shopping for your high quality bud, anybody claiming to have “Organic” weed is pulling your leg. If you want the quality experience, look for the Clean Green Certified or Certified Kind logo, and you’ll be on your way towards high quality elevation.

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