Edibles

What to do if you pet ingests cannabis....

Step 1. Determine the type and potency.

Here's a quick rundown of the types of cannabis your pet could have gotten into, ranked fromleast severe to most severe:

  • Raw cannabis flower - least severe because it's not decarboxylated, so the THC hasn't been activated
  • Vaped or burned cannabis flower - not ideal because there could still be some activated THC in it
  • Non-chocolate infused edibles - can vary in danger levels depending on the edible's potency and ingredients
  • Cannabutter - can vary in danger levels depending on the potency of the cannabutter
  • Concentrates - inherently potent; therefore, even the smallest amount of concentrate(e.g., a dab) can have an acute effect on an animal, particularly smaller pets
  • Chocolate-infused edibles - can vary in danger levels depending on the edible's potency, but certain properties in chocolate can be toxic to animals such as dogs and cats

Step 2. Evaluate your animal's symptoms.

Check for the following symptoms your pet is exhibiting:

  • Mild toxicity will result in sluggishness, lethargy, excessive saliva production, and wobbling.
  • More extreme cases may result in loss of bodily control, urinary incontinence, low blood pressure, a slow heart rate, seizures, or even death (via asphyxiation on their own vomit)

Step 3. Soak up the bad stuff.

You can try avoiding a worst-case scenario for your precious furbaby by soaking up your pet's stomach contents. Activated charcoal is available at most drug stores and can soak up the toxins in your pet’s stomach, including any remaining THC that hasn’t been absorbed into their bloodstream yet.

Note: Do not attempt to use activated charcoal if you’ve already tried to induce vomiting.

Step 4. Induce Vomiting.

If step 3 didn't work, try to make your pet puke. You can use hydrogen peroxide to induce vomiting -- use one teaspoon per 10 pounds on your pet, every 15 minutes (no more than three times total).

Monitor your pet closely, as this method can result in excessive vomiting or bloody stool. Don’t overdo it and watch for signs of distress, in which case you may need to seek a professional.

Note: You will feel awful and heartless and your pet will not understand why this is happening. Sorry, that’s just how it goes.

Step 5. Seek Professional Help.

If all else fails, and especially if you realize that your pet has consumed a large amount of cannabis or THC, this may be a necessary, and even life-saving next step. Be honest with your veterinarian – he or she will be able to determine the outcome either way, so transparency will save you both time in the long run.

Give the vet as much information as possible – what kind of product, its potency, how long it has been since it was ingested, etc. For example, if the edible contained chocolate, this could put your pet at further risk, so try to be specific with details.

Read the full article from Leafly HERE.

Gaia Medbar gets DOPE

On Feb 1, 2016 Dope Magazine published an article about Gaia Medbars, a delicious chocolate bar which we happen to carry. If you haven't tried one, come down quick to get a taste!

"Edible enthusiasts unite in celebration as talented culinary artisans and visionaries shake the shackles of cannabis prohibition and create progressive new dishes using THC infused ingredients. Accomplished chefs Megan Endres and Zack Derck have teamed up with DOPE Magazine to repurpose and give new life to the handcrafted cannabinoid-laden chocolate Gaia Medbar."

Read the full article HERE.

Weed, pot, bud, Mary Jane - The Etymology Of Marijuana Slang

Yes, weed is apparently the broadly hippest current term for marijuana, that venerable fount of slang. "Marijuana" is an anglicized, which means the conversion into an English form, term of the Spanish words "marihuana" or "marijguana," which identify the cannabis plant. The English knew this plant as "hemp." According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the debate over the use of the drug in the US in the 1930s attributed to "marijuana" being the “exotic alternative to the familiar words hemp and cannabis.”

Because of the controversy surrounding marijuana during that era, many other slang terms were birthed around the same time. American Speech included ‘weed’ in 1929’s “Among the New Words,” defined as a “marijuana cigarette.” Just a few years later, the Chicago Defender reported using the word "reefer." And we can all remember 1936’s Reefer Madness to illustrate that history.

In Google Books searches confined to 2013 publications, smoke marijuana pops up 69 times, smoke pot 94 times, and smoke weed 149 times.Why the recent weed dominance? It seems clear to me that it's a generational thing. In the 1990s, a new generation of users wanted to distance themselves from their parents' dope or pot (the latter dates from the 1930s and apparently originated in African-American slang). Weed was already in the lexicon, and provided a nice implicit variation on the hippie-ish grass.

So which term is the most popular nowadays? According to the Google chart displaying the frequency of various cannabis slang terms used in American publications in the past 50 years, "weed" is the only term to actually be increasing in recent use. (=Also interesting is how rapid the rise in popularity of "pot" and "marijuana" were in the 1960s. To back that claim, in a Google Books search on the year 2013, results used the term "smoke marijuana" 69 times, "smoke pot" 94 times, and "smoke weed" 149 times. Not to mention that Urban Dictionary has over 225 separate definitions for just "weed." Slate attributes the popularity of "weed’ over other slang terms to how casual the word is, since it has already has another meaning as well – those unwanted plants in your yard. Using "weed" is simple and easy compared to "cannabis" or "ganja." Also contributing is a generational evolution, “In the 1990s, a new generation of users wanted to distance themselves from their parents’ dope or pot.

To read more about the etymology of cannabis slang, here are the links to the original HighTimes and Slate articles.

And here is the link to Leafly's Glossary of Cannabis Terms.

Trust your Bud- Gorge Greenery is Pesticide Free!

While this article was released in June earlier this year, it's come to our attention that many medical patients and recreational users alike are unaware of the serious risk of pesticides in Cannabis flower and products. Here at Gorge Greenery, we carry Clean Green Certified gardens and send everything out to OG Analytical (one of the trusted labs used in this study), for the most comprehensive pesticide screening capabilities in Oregon to ensure clean product every time.

"Dab Society Dutch Treat, a potent cannabis extract sold to medical marijuana patients, sailed through state-mandated pesticide testing. The results were printed on the label, backed by an official report. Workers at a Southeast Portland dispensary were happy to share the lab certificate. All you had to do was ask.

But, in fact, two laboratories commissioned by The Oregonian/OregonLive found pesticides in the same sample of Dutch Treat at levels above what the state allows.

It wasn’t an isolated case.

A combination of lax state rules, inconsistent lab practices and inaccurate test results has allowed pesticide-laced products to enter the medical marijuana market, The Oregonian/OregonLive has found.

Marijuana that fails a pesticide screen is not supposed to be sold to patients. But two other cannabis products in addition to Dutch Treat also tested above acceptable levels for pesticides.

The Oregonian/OregonLive shopped at Oregon dispensaries, bought cannabis that had passed pesticide tests and sent the samples to independent labs for further screening. Two labs performed the analysis: OG Analytical, a marijuana testing lab in Eugene, and Pacific Agricultural Laboratory, a Portland lab that specializes in detecting pesticides on foods and agricultural commodities. Both confirmed in blind testing the presence of pesticides that should have triggered red flags from previous labs."

Read the full article from The Oregonian/OregonLive HERE.